How-to Add a Grand Total Line on an Excel Stacked Column Pivot Chart

Final Stacked Column Pivot Chart with a Grand Total Line
Final Stacked Column Pivot Chart with a Grand Total Line
Today I answer a viewer question. “How do I add a cumulative grand total amount as a line above a stacked column pivot chart in Excel?”  Well there are a few tips and tricks to create this type of pivot chart, but you can see how to do it in this tutorial.
Here is what they wanted as their final chart to look like:
Final Stacked Column Pivot Chart with a Grand Total Line
Final Stacked Column Pivot Chart with a Grand Total Line
Now this may seem easy, but Excel Pivot Charts have some limitations.  One issue is that you cannot include additional chart series that are not already in the pivot table.  The second issue is that although pivot tables display the grand total, you can’t include it in the chart.
But this is something that we can do!  So let’s get to it.
The Breakdown

1) Insert an Excel Table

2) Add an Additional Grand Total Column to the Excel Table

3) Insert a Pivot Table

4) Create Pivot Chart

5) Change Chart Type





6) Remove Legend Entries

 

Step-by-Step

1) Insert an Excel Table

I am liking Excel Tables more and more every day [Pete changed my mind!].  So this tutorial will involve Tables.



If your data looks like this:

Region Product Sales
1 a 100
2 a 105
3 a 90
1 b 25
2 b 50
3 b 40
1 c 10
2 c 20
3 c 30
1 d 75
2 d 70
3 d 60

We need to transform it into an Excel Table by highlighting the data range and then selecting the Insert Ribbon.  Then click on the Table button or simply press CTRL+T.

Insert Excel Table
Insert Excel Table

Your table will now look like this:

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Excel Table of Data
Excel Table of Data

 

2) Add an Additional Grand Total Column to the Excel Table





The first trick of this tutorial is that we need to add a new column of data to the Excel Table that we will then add to the Pivot Table to create our line.

To create a new column of data, type in a new header label next to the Sales Values.  In our case, we will call it “Grand Total by Region”.

Then in the first cell below the new label for the column, type in this formula that will sum the amount of all Sales for the given region:

=SUMIF([[Region]],[@Region],[[Sales]])





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Check out this post and also watch the video below to understand why you need the extra brackets around the first Region and the Sales fields.

copy-paste-vs-fill-handle-copy-with-tables-references-in-an-excel-formula



Your Excel Table of data will now look like this:

Final Excel Table of Data for Pivot Table
Final Excel Table of Data for Pivot Table

 

3) Insert a Pivot Table

Now we have laid the foundation for the Pivot Chart, but first we need to create a Pivot Table.  To do this, simply click anywhere in the Excel Table and click on the Insert Menu and then click on the Pivot Table button.





Insert Pivot Table
Insert Pivot Table

Then you want to set up your fields like this in the pivot table:

Pivot Table
Pivot Table

Watch the video below if you don’t know exactly how to create this pivot table.

Your pivot table will now look like this:

Final Excel Pivot Table
Final Excel Pivot Table

 

4) Create Pivot Chart



Now that you have created the Pivot Table, we can create a Pivot Chart simply by clicking anywhere in the final pivot table and then click on the Insert Ribbon and then click on the Stacked Column Chart in the 2-D Column Chart button in the Chart group.

Insert Stacked Column Pivot Chart
Insert Stacked Column Pivot Chart

Your chart will now look like this:

Initial Pivot Chart
Initial Pivot Chart

 

5) Change Chart Type

Now all we need to do is select one of the “Sum of Grand Total by Region” series and “Change Chart Type” from the Design Ribbon to a Line Chart.





Change Chart Type in Excel
Change Chart Type in Excel

In Excel 2013 and Excel 2016, you will get a real nice dialog box where you can change them all at once.  In Excel 2007 and Excel 2010, you may have to select each series and change each series individually.  If you are having problems selecting the right series or even seeing the right series, check out this post:

how-to-select-data-series-in-an-excel-chart-when-they-are-un-selectable

Change Chart Type in Excel 2016 Dialog Box
Change Chart Type in Excel 2016 Dialog Box

Your chart is almost done and will now look like this:

Pivot Chart with Grand Total Lines
Pivot Chart with Grand Total Lines

Even thought you have 3 overlapping lines, you can’t see them when viewing the chart, but if you must, you can hide them by selecting 2 of the 3 lines and changing the line color to No Line.

 



6) Remove Legend Entries

One thing left to do is a matter of preference.  I prefer to Hide All Field Button on the Chart.  You can do this by right clicking on the grey buttons in the chart.

The other thing to complete is to remove the Grand Total by Region legend entries.  To do that, simply select the chart, then select the Legend Entry you want to remove and press your delete key.  Repeat for all of the legend entries you wish to remove.

Your final chart now looks like this:

Final Stacked Column Pivot Chart with a Grand Total Line
Final Stacked Column Pivot Chart with a Grand Total Line

 





Video Tutorial:

Check out this short video demonstration that will show you how quick and easy this Excel Pivot Table trick can be accomplished.

 

Free Sample File:



Download the sample and try-it-yourself demonstration Excel Pivot Chart file here:

How-to-Add-a-Grand-Total-Line-on-an-Excel-Stacked-Column-Pivot-Chart.xlsx

 

Do you like Pivot Charts or do you prefer to make a chart a regular chart with calculated formulas that summarize the data instead of having the pivot table do it for you?  Let me know in the comments below what you prefer.

 





Steve=True





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6 COMMENTS

  1. Looked at many different options but this was really the only thing that really did what I needed. My implementation used SUMIFS and 4 conditions driving into a pivot chart so there were a lot of differences, but this really got me pointed in the right direction. Many thanks!

  2. I’m getting frustrated with Grand Totals on PivotCharts!!! I have tried your steps on my data and my PT is not showing the same total on each of the new columns, but is actually adding them altogether. I’m not sure what’s different.

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